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Mugna Art Gallery is a platform dedicated to promoting local culture and fostering creativity through supporting emerging and undiscovered artists, offering a space for artistic expression and interaction with the community and wider audiences.

October 14, 2023 to December 10, 2023

KAMUGNAAN

Mugna Gallery
Valencia, Negros Oriental, Philippines

About

On Past, Present, and Paradigm

Dumaguete is a city right on the cusp of the new era, with a long history that dates to Pre-Philippine times. It has been a hub, a melting pot of cultures, but it has retained its identity so far; where between people and places, histories and mythologies, sets Negros Island as home to diversity and a multiverse of creativity.

Throughout the centuries, the island has beckoned travellers and adventurers from all over the world. Dolly Sordilla and Moshi Dokyo capture these moments whimsically, as Hersley Casero revels in a word: g i n h a w a.

Gerabelle Rae, Marjo Banagua, Rovan Caballes touch upon a history that is not commonly known outside the province. Caballes’ great grandmother, Ines V. Serion, was elected mayor of Vallehermoso in 1937, becoming the first woman mayor of the Philippines, and in Asia. This was in the same year that women’s suffrage was allowed in the country. The Cataal WWII Museum in Valencia, run by Gerabelle Rae’s uncle, informed her of stories of women’s survival and willpower during the war. Banagua ponders a common question Dumaguetenos are asked, “where did the name come from” — and the most acknowledged answer is from a reference to Pre-Philippine pirates’ unfortunate tendency to kidnap or “dagit” the women of the area. It has since been recontextualized as to how the city captures the hearts of people who visit, and a good number end up moving there, a modern-day “nadagit,” so to speak.

With practically the entire province under the watchful eye of Mount Talinis, it is but natural for many artworks to be made in tribute to its sharp gaze. Jude Millares leads this gesture, with Casero, and Gerabelle Rae also tracing the outline. From across the waters, Viviana Riccelli can see the peaks of Talinis, a connection to her residence in Siquijor that extends the mountain’s gaze.

Under the majestic mountain and in the surrounding seas, are a myriad of flora and fauna brimming with wonder and surrounded by charm. Trina Montenegro presents a Mystery Plant, as Sandy Dupio’s October Bloom quietly whispers. Carmen del Prado’s day and night photograph of Piggy Bank harks to the open seas, where Stonefish, as exquisitely painted by Danni Sollesta reside. Amelia Duwenhoegger’s visual cacophony of Rabbits is basically a bottomless well of entertainment.

Known for a distinct ceramic tradition by way of terracotta, the sensitivities and nuances of production are demonstrated by Hemrod Duran’s strategic chess pieces, and Mikoo Cataylo’s self-portrait depicts a winning move on the board. Not behind in any way, Dyn Quilnet’s empowering creation spotlights the female gaze, as Jana Jumalon creates a Passage by way of a rare flower. These works bridge the reflective and reflexive nature of ceramics.

Although the local aesthetic largely revolves around direct depictions of people, places and things, a contemporary approach has vibrant representation with the likes of Jomir Tabudlong, Faye Manalo, and Daniel Vincent carrying the torch. Straddling the artistic disciplines of visual art and fashion design, Dan Duran sews as much as he sees. Looking within, Jo Camille explores galaxies unexplored, even for herself. Putting down his coordinates, artistic mentor to many Babbu Wenceslao shines on; as young educator Ma. Isabel Gutang pushes art outside the frame.

The popular title of “The City of Gentle People” is examined through the works of Florenz Dionisio and Kevin Cornelia — showing people in their natural environment — chilling and smiling — whereas Rey Labarento provides a cheeky version. Iris Tirambulo presents a community quilt — made by locals who attended her workshop Halaran a few months back. Duwenhoegger’s rabbits — in all their human and humanesque behavior — also provide an uncanny view of daily life.

The mystery and magic of the island beckons to the Santelmo and Sigbin, by Budoy Marabiles and Mariana Varela respectively, as Jutsze Pamate lands a Flex on the table (or wall). Cristina “Kitty” Taniguchi’s work, Untitled as it may be, is a storyboard of experience and wonder, where fantasy, reality and possibility share the canvas. Dialling things back to an in-between space is Samanthis, traversing the realm of The Visitor. Mythology is not lost, as Portia Nemeño tells a timeless tale with her Sugilanon.

In the spirit of the times, perhaps a contemporaneity all to Dumaguete, Alta Jia’s undulating imagery and Geneva Alvarez’ un-quotidian compositions both embody a pervasive language that sets the stage for a future that only gets more and more exciting.

Putting together an exhibition to highlight the wealth and number of different styles, techniques, and personalities of a locale is always a Herculean task, as the push and pull, the width and breadth of experience and paradigm manifest in countless ways. Overcoming this, Mugna Gallery, in celebration of The Province of Negros Oriental Buglasan Festival 2023, presents an exhibition that gathers local artists and ties them along the string that is the Dumaguete Creative Spirit — a KAMUGNAAN like nothing else.

lxx, 2023
Valencia, NegOr

Participating Artists:

  • Alta Jia
  • Amelia Duwenhoegger
  • Babbu Wenceslao
  • Budoy Maribeles
  • Carmen Del Prado
  • Dan Dvran
  • Dani Sollesta
  • Daniel Vincent
  • Dolly Sordilla
  • Dyna Quilnet
  • Faye Manalo
  • Florenz Dionisio
  • Gerabelle Rae
  • Hemrod Duran/li>
  • Hersley-Ven Casero
  • Iris Tirambulo
  • Jana Jumalon
  • Jenny Alvarez
  • Jo Camille
  • Jomir Tabudlong
  • Jude Millares
  • Jutze Pamate
  • Kevin Cornelia
  • Kitty Tanaguchi
  • Koki
  • Ma. Isabel Gutang
  • Mariana Varela
  • Marjo Banagua
  • Mikoo Cataylo
  • Moshi Dokyo
  • Portia Nemeño
  • Rey Labarento
  • Royan Caballes
  • Samnathis
  • Sandy Dupio
  • Trina Montengro
  • Viviana Riccelli

    On Past, Present, and Paradigm

    Dumaguete is a city right on the cusp of the new era, with a long history that dates to Pre-Philippine times. It has been a hub, a melting pot of cultures, but it has retained its identity so far; where between people and places, histories and mythologies, sets Negros Island as home to diversity and a multiverse of creativity.

    Throughout the centuries, the island has beckoned travellers and adventurers from all over the world. Dolly Sordilla and Moshi Dokyo capture these moments whimsically, as Hersley Casero revels in a word: g i n h a w a.

    Gerabelle Rae, Marjo Banagua, Rovan Caballes touch upon a history that is not commonly known outside the province. Caballes’ great grandmother, Ines V. Serion, was elected mayor of Vallehermoso in 1937, becoming the first woman mayor of the Philippines, and in Asia. This was in the same year that women’s suffrage was allowed in the country. The Cataal WWII Museum in Valencia, run by Gerabelle Rae’s uncle, informed her of stories of women’s survival and willpower during the war. Banagua ponders a common question Dumaguetenos are asked, “where did the name come from” — and the most acknowledged answer is from a reference to Pre-Philippine pirates’ unfortunate tendency to kidnap or “dagit” the women of the area. It has since been recontextualized as to how the city captures the hearts of people who visit, and a good number end up moving there, a modern-day “nadagit,” so to speak.

    With practically the entire province under the watchful eye of Mount Talinis, it is but natural for many artworks to be made in tribute to its sharp gaze. Jude Millares leads this gesture, with Casero, and Gerabelle Rae also tracing the outline. From across the waters, Viviana Riccelli can see the peaks of Talinis, a connection to her residence in Siquijor that extends the mountain’s gaze.

    Under the majestic mountain and in the surrounding seas, are a myriad of flora and fauna brimming with wonder and surrounded by charm. Trina Montenegro presents a Mystery Plant, as Sandy Dupio’s October Bloom quietly whispers. Carmen del Prado’s day and night photograph of Piggy Bank harks to the open seas, where Stonefish, as exquisitely painted by Danni Sollesta reside. Amelia Duwenhoegger’s visual cacophony of Rabbits is basically a bottomless well of entertainment.

    Known for a distinct ceramic tradition by way of terracotta, the sensitivities and nuances of production are demonstrated by Hemrod Duran’s strategic chess pieces, and Mikoo Cataylo’s self-portrait depicts a winning move on the board. Not behind in any way, Dyn Quilnet’s empowering creation spotlights the female gaze, as Jana Jumalon creates a Passage by way of a rare flower. These works bridge the reflective and reflexive nature of ceramics.

    Although the local aesthetic largely revolves around direct depictions of people, places and things, a contemporary approach has vibrant representation with the likes of Jomir Tabudlong, Faye Manalo, and Daniel Vincent carrying the torch. Straddling the artistic disciplines of visual art and fashion design, Dan Duran sews as much as he sees. Looking within, Jo Camille explores galaxies unexplored, even for herself. Putting down his coordinates, artistic mentor to many Babbu Wenceslao shines on; as young educator Ma. Isabel Gutang pushes art outside the frame.

    The popular title of “The City of Gentle People” is examined through the works of Florenz Dionisio and Kevin Cornelia — showing people in their natural environment — chilling and smiling — whereas Rey Labarento provides a cheeky version. Iris Tirambulo presents a community quilt — made by locals who attended her workshop Halaran a few months back. Duwenhoegger’s rabbits — in all their human and humanesque behavior — also provide an uncanny view of daily life.

    The mystery and magic of the island beckons to the Santelmo and Sigbin, by Budoy Marabiles and Mariana Varela respectively, as Jutsze Pamate lands a Flex on the table (or wall). Cristina “Kitty” Taniguchi’s work, Untitled as it may be, is a storyboard of experience and wonder, where fantasy, reality and possibility share the canvas. Dialling things back to an in-between space is Samanthis, traversing the realm of The Visitor. Mythology is not lost, as Portia Nemeño tells a timeless tale with her Sugilanon.

    In the spirit of the times, perhaps a contemporaneity all to Dumaguete, Alta Jia’s undulating imagery and Geneva Alvarez’ un-quotidian compositions both embody a pervasive language that sets the stage for a future that only gets more and more exciting.

    Putting together an exhibition to highlight the wealth and number of different styles, techniques, and personalities of a locale is always a Herculean task, as the push and pull, the width and breadth of experience and paradigm manifest in countless ways. Overcoming this, Mugna Gallery, in celebration of The Province of Negros Oriental Buglasan Festival 2023, presents an exhibition that gathers local artists and ties them along the string that is the Dumaguete Creative Spirit — a KAMUGNAAN like nothing else.

    lxx, 2023
    Valencia, NegOr

    Participating Artists:

  • Alta Jia
  • Amelia Duwenhoegger
  • Babbu Wenceslao
  • Budoy Maribeles
  • Carmen Del Prado
  • Dan Dvran
  • Dani Sollesta
  • Daniel Vincent
  • Dolly Sordilla
  • Dyna Quilnet
  • Faye Manalo
  • Florenz Dionisio
  • Gerabelle Rae
  • Hemrod Duran/li>
  • Hersley-Ven Casero
  • Iris Tirambulo
  • Jana Jumalon
  • Jenny Alvarez
  • Jo Camille
  • Jomir Tabudlong
  • Jude Millares
  • Jutze Pamate
  • Kevin Cornelia
  • Kitty Tanaguchi
  • Koki
  • Ma. Isabel Gutang
  • Mariana Varela
  • Marjo Banagua
  • Mikoo Cataylo
  • Moshi Dokyo
  • Portia Nemeño
  • Rey Labarento
  • Royan Caballes
  • Samnathis
  • Sandy Dupio
  • Trina Montengro
  • Viviana Riccelli
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